Water in West Palm Beach

West Palm Beach Water Needs Upgrading

Text Map of West Palm Beach water region

Learn How to Keep Yourself Safe While Drinking Water

If you’re like most people, your schedule is hectic. You’re either worrying about work, what to prepare for dinner or checking in on a friend. The quality of your water probably isn’t something that regularly crosses your mind—but it should be at the forefront of everything! Studies have proven that contaminants in West Palm Beach water are dangerous.

Learn more about West Palm Beach water to see which contaminants are impacting your health. You’ll also learn:

  • Where West Palm Beach water comes from
  • Which pollutants are present in the drinking water
  • How you can stay healthy
  • How Angel Water can keep you safe from these toxins
Tell Us How We Can Help!

How Does West Palm Beach Get Its Water?

The City of West Palm Beach gets its water from rainfall stored in a part of the Everglades Ecosystem known as the Grassy Water Preserve. The West Palm Beach water department also sometimes gets its water supply from Lake Okeechobee when needed. What’s interesting about the system is that it replenishes itself, and part of the Everglades are protected, meaning they’re well maintained.

In addition, WPB water filters itself. How so, you ask? Blue and green algae (paraphytes) that often covers Lake Okeechobee are natural filtration systems that produce clear water. If any contaminants are present by the time the water gets to the Grassy Water Preserve, they’re tested and eliminated before going to the water treatment plant. The water treatment plant serves around 112,000 citizens of Palm Beach.

As if contaminated water wasn’t bad enough, you must also be on the lookout for hard water.

West Palm Beach water has a hardness level of 317 parts per million or 19 gpg. The numbers indicate very hard water and can create a host of problems for residents. Issues that might come to fruition include:

  • Spots on dishes
  • Brittle hair or hair that feels dirty
  • Dry skin
  • Broken appliances
  • Markings on clothing

A water’s hardness level increases when there’s a significant buildup of minerals in the supply. Water softeners get rid of the buildup so that the supply is fresh and clean. So, think about getting a water softener if you live in West Palm Beach!

What’s in the Drinking Water in West Palm Beach?

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has standards that every city’s water supply must abide by. However, these benchmarks haven’t been upgraded in years, and they aren’t nearly strict enough to protect human health.

Therefore, we strongly recommend looking at the Environment Working Group’s (EWG) numbers over the EPAs. The EWG gives you an unbiased opinion of what your water should look like. Unlike the EPA, the EWG is a non-profit independent organization that wants you to have the cleanest water possible.

Here is an overview of the contaminants detected in West Palm Beach water that exceed the EWG’s health guidelines.

Contaminant Total EWG Recommended
Chromium (hexavalent) total .110 ppb EWG guideline 0.02ppb
Haloacetic Acids (HAA9) total 18.3ppb EWG guideline 0.06ppb
Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM) total 37.1ppb EWG guideline 0.15ppb

Let’s take a closer look at these contaminants and the problems they can cause.

Chromium (Hexavalent)

Hexavalent chromium, also called chromium-6, is a naturally occurring carcinogen that comes from industrial environments. Although West Palm Beach’s numbers are below the national average, they’re still high.

You might experience severe health issues if you’re subjected to too much chromium-6. Several cancers, respiratory diseases, and heart and liver problems have been associated with high levels of exposure.

Haloacetic Acids

Haloacetic acids are nine disinfectants that can form when water is treated with chlorine or chloramine. West Palm Beach’s water department treats its water with chlorine because it’s the most effective solution. Though there are several health issues linked to chlorine, its positives outweigh the negatives.

Total Trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

Like Haloacetic acids, total trihalomethanes pop up during the treatment process. Only one, Bromochloromethane, tested higher than the EWG’s guidelines.

Excessive exposure to TTHMs has been linked to bladder, kidney, and liver cancer.

Other Contaminants Detected

The EWG also found other contaminants in the City of Palm Beach water. These include:

  • Aluminum
  • Barium
  • Chlorate
  • Chromium
  • Cyanide
  • Di(2-ethyhexyl) phthalate
  • Fluoride
  • Manganese
  • Molybdenum
  • Nitrate
  • Nitrite
  • Strontium
  • Vanadium

It should be noted that these toxins didn’t exceed EWG’s guidelines, but they’re still present and can lead to health problems. You can learn more at the EWG’s West Palm Beach page.

How Can West Palm Beach Residents Protect Themselves?

There’s no magic bullet when it comes to getting clean water, but we’re going to do everything we can to find a solution for you! Below is a list of things you can try if you suspect your WPB water isn’t as clean as it should be.

Step 1: Have Your Water Tested

You should have your supply tested if you suspect something is wrong with your water. West Palm Beach water companies, like Angel Water, know what to look for during these tests—better yet, they know what solutions are needed. Contact the team if your hair is more brittle than usual or if your food tastes funny. Angel Water will get to the bottom of it.

Step 2: Get an NSF/ANSI 58 Certified Reverse Osmosis System to Remove Contaminants

Professionals at Angel Water might determine that you need a water filter. Our recommendation is an under the sink reverse osmosis system. RO systems go beyond EPA standards and filter out additional contaminants. For example, these systems remove:

  • Chromium (Hexavalent)
  • Chromium (Total)
  • Germanium
  • Haloacetic Acids
  • Molybdenum
  • Total Trihalomethanes
  • And More!

RO systems work differently than traditional systems because they have membranes where additional filtration takes place. Sometimes, RO systems work too well and remove beneficial minerals from the supply. Don’t worry; though, some RO filters come with additional features that allow you to add these minerals back into the water.

Your RO system should be NSF/ANSI 58 certified. NSF/ANSI 58 certified RO systems have surpassed additional standards that typical filters have not.

Step 3: Think About Getting an NSF/ANSI 44 Certified Water Softener to Get Rid of Hard Water

Let’s say hard water is your problem! We recommend NSF/ANSI 44 certified water softeners to get rid of hard water. These systems also remove radium 226/228.

We would also recommend a salt-based softener instead of a salt-free conditioner. Salt-free systems only remove scale on plumbing; they don’t actually soften the water. These devices alter the water for a time, just so it can pass through the plumbing, but the water is still hard after the process.

Step 4: Get Your Systems Installed by the Pros and Make Sure to Maintain Them

Finally, you should have either one of these systems installed by a professional. Trying to do things on your own can create headaches and lead to massive plumbing problems. Regular maintenance should follow this installation. Fear not; Angel Water will take care of this, too.


Our Mission is to Provide West Palm Beach with Clean Water

As you can see, your West Palm Beach water could be full of contaminants. This isn’t right! So, it’s important to follow the solutions laid out to ensure your supply is healthy. Have your water tested, consider getting an RO system installed, discover if you need a water softener and call the experts to have these systems installed and maintained. Give us a call today!

Tell Us How We Can Help!

Please call us today at 847-382-7800

or fill out the form below to talk with an expert or schedule a free consultation!

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