What's Wrong With Your Water?

Water in Glenview, IL

Has the Following Known Issues:

City Water

Radium*

High levels of radium have shown an increased incidence of bone, liver, and breast cancer

Lead*

Too much lead in the human body can cause serious damage to the brain, nervous system and red blood cells

In babies and children, exposure to lead in drinking water above the action level can result in delays in physical and mental development

Well Water

Don’t Know?

The EPA states you should test your own water from your well

Orange Staining

IRON – Organic and found naturally occurring in the earth’s crust

Foul Odor

IRON BACTERIA – Causes rotten egg smell and can change the taste of your water and cause dry itchy skin

Glenview, IL Water Information

Website: http://glenview.il.us/

Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glenview,_Illinois

Water in Glenview, Illinois

The-Dangers-of-Contaminated-Tap-Water

Glenview currently meets its drinking water needs by buying Lake Michigan water from the Village of Wilmette. The Wilmette water plant on Lake Avenue, right on the waterfront, draws water from two intake pipes that extend a mile into the lake. This raw water is chemically treated and filtered in the plant, then piped westward into Glenview. Millions of gallons of that water pass into Glenview each day, flowing into one of four reservoir/pumping stations throughout the city. These stations treat the water with a bit more chlorine before pumping it to the rest of the city.

While Lake Michigan water is the norm throughout much of the Chicago Metropolitan Area, there continues to be a lot of debate over the cleanliness and safety of water from the lake. And even with all the precautions the city takes there were still drinking fountains in Glenview schools which were recently found to have elevated levels of lead.

In some states a small percentage of tests were performed before water was tested, and some contaminants were subsequently removed or diluted. As a result, some reported levels of contamination may be higher than were present at the tap. Results shown are based on individual samples and may not indicate a violation of the Safe Drinking Water Act, which often occurs only after prolonged tests show concentrations above a legal limit.

1 Contaminants below legal limits, but above health guidelines.

Contaminants Above Limits Water in Glenview, IL

11 Contaminants found within health guidelines and legal limits.

Contaminants in Guidelines in Water in Glenview, IL
*As reported by the NY Times Toxic Water Report.

About Glenview, IL

Map Glenview, IllinoisThe region where Glenview is now located was originally inhabited by the Winnebago and then Potawatomi tribes of Native Americans. Over time, these agricultural societies were displaced and their land gradually seized in a series of treaties, until in the Treaty of Chicago in 1833 the native tribes were forced to give up their last five million acres and surrender all claims to Northern Illinois. It’s at this time that the first white settlers moved into the what is now modern Glenview, at the time referred to as South Northfield.

The community grew and prospered during the Civil War years, and then in 1871 the Great Chicago Fire brought the construction of the Chicago and Milwaukee Railroad. This railroad was used to service Chicago’s rebuilding needs and it ran right through the center of town, making Chicago suddenly accessible to South Northfield and creating opportunities for manufacturing and the delivery of agricultural products to the city.

The designation of South Northfield was a mouthful though, and so in 1878 Fred Hutchings renamed the community Oak Glen. However, there was already a community that had incorporated as Oak Glen and the railroad wanted to avert confusion with a different name. They suggested Hutchings, in honor of the railroad benefactor Sarah Hutchings’s late husband James, but she didn’t want their name on the station which consisted of a run-down old box car. They opted to name the station Barr after the railroad division superintendent, and so it remained until 1895, when the community, pressured by the post office to finally pick a formal name, held a meeting where Glenview was voted the new name.

A few years later, with the population increasing faster than resources could be provided, the community held a vote to incorporate. It failed, but a year later in 1899 a second vote passed, and the Village of Glenview was born with a population of 325.

Since then, Glenview has enjoyed bountiful success and grown into a sizeable town. The population has grown from 6,142 in 1950 to 41,847 in 2000. In 1967 the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) purchased five acres in Glenview to use as a conservation and botanical research area called Peacock Prairie. It’s now one of the only remaining pieces of untouched prairie in Illinois. Kraft Foods, Scott Foresman and Co., and Zenith Electronics have additionally all located their headquarters in Glenview.

With a mix of natural beauty and modern progress, the community of Glenview has much to be proud of and more to look forward to.


 

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