What's Wrong With Your Water?

Water in Hoffman Estates, IL

Has the Following Known Issues:

City Water

Radium*

High levels of radium have shown an increased incidence of bone, liver, and breast cancer

Lead*

Too much lead in the human body can cause serious damage to the brain, nervous system and red blood cells

In babies and children, exposure to lead in drinking water above the action level can result in delays in physical and mental development

Well Water

Don’t Know?

The EPA states you should test your own water from your well

Orange Staining

IRON – Organic and found naturally occurring in the earth’s crust

Foul Odor

IRON BACTERIA – Causes rotten egg smell and can change the taste of your water and cause dry itchy skin

Hoffman Estates, IL Water Information

Website: http://www.hoffmanestates.com/home

Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoffman_Estates,_Illinois

Water in Hoffman Estates, Illinois

The-Dangers-of-Contaminated-Tap-Water

Hoffman Estates, IL has purchased its water from the City of Chicago since 1985. Lake Michigan is the source of this water. Chicago uses two water treatment plants to treat all drinking water from Lake Michigan. The treated water is received at two reservoirs owned by the Northwest Suburban Municipal Joint Action Water Agency, and then through the main pumping station. Once in Hoffman Estates, the water does not receive any additional treatment and is sent directly into businesses and homes through water mains. Hoffman Estates also maintains seven ground water wells, in case of emergency or if Lake Michigan water supply were interrupted.

All surface water sources are susceptible to potential pollution problems. Chicago’s water intakes are located at a distance from offshore, but at certain times of the year, the potential for contamination exists due to wet-weather flows and river reversals. Also, the placement of the crib structures can attract waterfowl, gulls and terns which concentrate fecal deposits at the intake. Lastly, since the predominant land use within Illinois boundary of Lake Michigan watershed is urban, water drinkers should be aware that everyday activities in an urban setting could have a negative impact on their water.

 

1 contaminants above legal limits.

In some states a small percentage of tests were performed before water was tested, and some contaminants were subsequently removed or diluted. As a result, some reported levels of contamination may be higher than were present at the tap. Results shown are based on individual samples and may not indicate a violation of the Safe Drinking Water Act, which often occurs only after prolonged tests show concentrations above a legal limit.

Hoffman Estates Water Contaminants Above Legal Limit

3 Contaminants below legal limits, but above health guidelines.

Hoffman Estates Water Contaminants Above Health Limit

19 Contaminants found within health guidelines and legal limits.

Hoffman Estates Water Contaminants
*As reported by the NY Times Toxic Water Report.

 

About Hoffman Estates

Map of Hoffman Estates, ILHoffman Estates, IL, located in Cook County about 29 miles northwest of the Loop, began as part of neighboring Schaumburg Township. In the 1940s, farmers began purchasing land in the area and the many towns and villages that began popping up were still not incorporated as of the early 1950s. The Schaumburg Centre at Roselle and the surrounding roads acted as the town’s nucleus with approximately 25 homes surrounding them – the remainder of the area was working farmland.

In the mid-1950s, Sam and Jack Hoffman, owners of a father-son construction company, purchased a 160 acre tract of land just east of Roselle Road. Later, after purchasing an additional 600 acres of land in the area, the father-son team had 40 of their original acres rezoned to 10,000-square-feet of home sites. These homes were especially appealing to those looking to live outside of the suburbs. The Hoffmans also donated four church and two park sites to the area, only adding to the desirability.

In addition to the park and church sites, Sam and Jack Hoffman began construction on the town’s first school. All of the residential additions to the area came with resistance from current residents – the townspeople of Schaumburg wished to keep the home sites with a minimum of five acres of land. As development continued, residents began annexing sites of land in order to stop the construction. When the annexed plots of land had almost completely encircled the construction area, which would later become Hoffman Estates, the townspeople sought to have the area incorporated.

Citizens living in Hoffman Estates were outraged and, to fight the annexation of the surrounding area, they formed a homeowner’s association and filed a lawsuit. When the suit against Schaumburg Centre was lost the two towns continued to feud. By 1960, Hoffman Estates and its 8,000 residents had been incorporated and the town immediately began annexing land. The first parcel to be annexed was just south of Roselle and Higgins Roads and the second was a 120 acre tract that was already a part of Schaumburg Centre – they asked that this be disannexed and returned to Hoffman Estates.

Schaumburg Centre was unsuccessful in challenging the annexations by Hoffman Estates and, by 1962, the size of the village had doubled. This new territory included the Paul Douglas Forest Preserve as well as land north of the Northwest Toll Road. In the end, Hoffman Estates accumulated over 4,000 acres of forest preserves, making up one-third of its total geographical area. By 1990, Hoffman Estates population had doubled, from 22,238 to 46,561. By 2000, its population nearly reached 50,000 people.

 


 

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